Does the three seconds stop rule exist?

Stop sign in Australia
Car stop sign Australia

In the past we've received various inquiries from Members in regards to ‘the three seconds rule’ but does this rule legally apply when stopping at a stop sign or line?

READY 1,2,3: No need to count, just make sure you come to a complete stop first!

There is no 3 seconds rule. When stopping at a stop sign or stop line you need to come to a complete stop at or before the stop line (or intersection if there is no stop line), look and then give way to vehicles and/or pedestrians. Once it is safe, proceed.

Part 7 of Road Rules 2014 covers giving way.
67 Stopping and giving way at a stop sign or stop line at an intersection without traffic lights

(1) A driver at an intersection with a stop sign or stop line, but without traffic lights, must stop and give way in accordance with this rule. Maximum penalty: 20 penalty units.

(2) The driver must stop as near as practicable to, but before reaching: (a) the stop line, or (b) if there is no stop line-the intersection.

This rule is also applies for 68 Stopping and giving way at a stop sign or stop line at other places.

Chances are if you’ve ever driven past the white line or into the intersection without stopping first, you’ve already committed an offence, which can attract a fine of $330 and 3 demerits points, or $439 and 4 demerit points in school zones.

Have you seen other motorists break this rule? 

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The information contained on this webpage is provided for general information purposes only and should not be relied upon as legal advice or as a substitute for legal advice.

Whilst we endeavour to ensure the information is complete and up to date, we make no warranties as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information and accept no responsibility for any loss or damage you may suffer as a result or your reliance on any part of it. Links to other websites are inserted for convenience only and do not constitute endorsement of material on those sites, or any associated organisation, product or service.